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US COVID-19 vaccination rate reflects 2020 election map

The COVID-19 vaccine saves lives. Vaccination efforts should be one of the rare things we all get together in an era of polarization. Vaccination rates by state show that even competition to protect people from the coronavirus is falling in line with well-known political policies. Look at the states that are paving the way for adults (aged 18+) with at least one coronavirus vaccine as of Thursday’s CDC report. Of the top 25 states with vaccination rates, President Joe Biden won 21 in the 2020 elections. Only four of the top 25 vaccinated states were won by former President Donald Trump in the last election. Trump won 21 of the bottom 25 for vaccination. This includes 16 of the bottom 17 states. Opinion polls have shown for some time that Democrats are more likely to be vaccinated than Republicans. Earlier this month, a poll at NPR / PBS-NewsHour / Marist College stated that 82% of Republicans were vaccinated against just 45%. Statistics revealed a similar division between Biden supporters (82%) and Trump supporters (44%). The correlation between vaccination rates and state election results in 2020 strengthened over time as supply exceeded demand. Now, not only in all the top 10 states of vaccination sites in Biden, but in all the top 20 states, the vaccination map isn’t just starting to look like the 2020 election map. That is, the underlying vital trends that drive both are similar. Education is becoming an increasingly important factor in the way people vote. Those with a college degree are much more likely to vote for democracy and much more likely to vote for the Republican Party. Currently, in 21 of the top 25 immunization states, the percentage of adults aged 25 and over with a college degree is above average. .. The reverse is also true: In 21 of the 25 lowest immunization rates, the proportion of adults with a college degree is below average. If we limit ourselves to white adults (because the educational inequality in elections is primarily among white voters), we find that they are basically the same. Of the top 25 immunization states, 20 have above average percentages of white adults with a college degree. This is also supported by polls. According to Marist’s survey, those who graduated from college are 24 points more likely to be vaccinated than those who have not graduated from college. Among white adults, it’s the same 24-point gap. Another major trend in the last few elections is the widening gap between urban and rural voting methods. The former has become more democratic and the latter has become more Republican. Trump acquired land in more rural areas, despite losing land nationwide in 2020. At this point, 17 of the top 25 immunized states have a higher proportion of urban dwellers than the national average. Only eight are below the national average of urban dwellers. Three (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont) are located in New England and tend to have the opposite tendency to have a well-educated adult population. Of the 25, 17 are more rural than the average state. The proportion of the population living in is high. Disappointing the division between urban and rural areas is that rural areas have actually begun vaccination in a hurry. According to a poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, more rural residents were vaccinated as of late March. But as supply became more available, that trend was reversed in the same poll. A very familiar urban / rural division was revealed. It is not exactly clear if anything can be done to prevent vaccination campaign trends from appearing to be dominant trends. The world of our politics. Polls show that Republican adults without local college education are much more likely to say they don’t want the vaccine (that is, they are resistant to the vaccine as well as hesitate). Many lives have fallen into the usual political traps, and you can do almost anything.

The COVID-19 vaccine saves lives. Vaccination efforts must be one of the rare things that connects us all in a polarized era and era.

Vaccination rates by state show that even competition to protect people from the coronavirus is falling in line with familiar political policies.

Look at the states that are currently paving the way for adults (aged 18+) who have been vaccinated with at least one coronavirus vaccine. Thursday’s CDC report.. Of the top 25 states by vaccination rate, President Joe Biden won 21 states in the 2020 elections.

Former President Donald Trump won only four of the top 25 vaccinated states in the last election. Trump won 21 of the bottom 25 for vaccination. This includes 16 of the bottom 17 states.

Polls have shown for some time that Democrats are more likely to be vaccinated than Republicans. A NPR / PBS-NewsHour / Marist College Poll Since the beginning of this month, 82% have been vaccinated, compared to just 45% of Republicans. Statistics revealed a similar division between Biden supporters (82%) and Trump supporters (44%).

The correlation between vaccination rates and state-specific 2020 election results has strengthened over time as supply exceeded demand.

Now, not only all of the top 10 states of vaccination sites that went to Biden, but all of the top 20.

But it’s not just that vaccination maps are starting to look like 2020 election maps. That is, the underlying vital trends that drive both of them are similar.

Education is becoming an increasingly important factor in how people vote. Those with a college degree are much more likely to vote for democracy, and those without a college degree are much more likely to vote for the Republican Party.

Currently, in 21 of the top 25 immunized states, the proportion of adults over the age of 25 is above average. University degree.. The reverse is also true. In 21 of the bottom 25 immunization rates, the proportion of adults with a college degree is below average.

If we limit ourselves to white adults only (because the educational disparity in elections is primarily among white voters), we find that they are basically the same. Of the top 25 immunization states, 20 have above average percentages of white adults with a college degree.

Again, this is backed up by polling. According to Marist’s survey, those who graduated from college are 24 points more likely to be vaccinated than those who have not graduated from college. Among white adults, it’s the same 24-point gap.

Another major trend in the last few elections is the widening gap in voting methods between urban and rural areas. The former has become more democratic and the latter has become more Republican.Trump in 2020 More rural areasEven if he loses ground nationwide.

At this point, 17 of the top 25 immunized states have a higher proportion of urban residents than the national average. Only eight are below the national average of urban dwellers. The three (Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont) are located in New England and tend to have the opposite tendency to have a well-educated adult population.

Of the bottom 25, 17 have a higher proportion of rural populations than the average state.

Disappointing the division between urban and rural areas is that rural areas have actually begun vaccination in a hurry.More rural residents said they had been vaccinated as of late March, according to the report. Kaiser Family Foundation Poll..But as supply becomes more available, the trend is Same poll..

A very familiar urban and rural division has emerged.

It is not exactly clear what can be done to prevent vaccination campaign trends from appearing to dominate our political world. Polls show that Republican adults without local college education are much more likely to say they don’t want the vaccine (that is, they are resistant to the vaccine as well as hesitate).

The scary thing is that if something that can save many lives falls into a normal political trap, you can do almost anything.

US COVID-19 vaccination rate reflects 2020 election map

Source link US COVID-19 vaccination rate reflects 2020 election map

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