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How the pandemic changed our diet

COVID-19 has influenced our lives in many ways, including how we eat and shop. Changes haven’t always gone a long way, according to a series of reports presented at the American Society for Nutrition’s annual meeting on Monday: unhealthy snacks and desserts such as chips, cookies and ice cream, and sweetened coffee. Also drink sugar-rich drinks such as tea, regular soda, fruit drinks, sports drinks and energy drinks. One-third (36%) of nearly 4,000 Americans surveyed in June 2020 People said they might eat unhealthy snacks and desserts than they did before the pandemic, and 22% said they would drink sugared drinks from time to time. Beverage with sugar. Those who reported eating the most unhealthy foods and drinks were Hispanics or blacks, most likely under the age of 65, obese, women, low-income and low-educated. They were also asked about availability and safety. Can nearly 6 out of 10 people (mainly low-income, unemployed, black or Hispanic adults) get food at nearby stores? He said he was worried that he might get COVID-19 from food. Early concerns that COVID-19 could spread through food packaging were quickly ignored by scientists. These findings show “reducing fear and intent,” such as food stocking and panic purchases. “We emphasize the importance of strategies and communication to prevent negative behavior,” said nutritionist Brianna Dumas. In a Fellow, Summary of the CDC’s Research Participation Program, public health officials further stated. , “Consumer awareness of emergency food access options, including promoting a safety net program for hunger, especially among groups affected by imbalances,” said Dumas. Health Food Decrease Another study analyzed the diets of more than 2,000 Americans before and after the pandemic and found that consumption of health foods such as vegetables and whole grains has decreased over the past year. ” This decrease was most pronounced among women. , Black and Latin research participants, and participants who have gained at least 5 pounds or more since 2018. ”Said Caroline Umm, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society, said in a statement. We plan to follow them to understand how their eating habits continue to change. In other studies, which factors, such as mental health and financial stress, contribute to changes in eating behavior. We plan to investigate if they may be involved. Child weight gain Nearly 30% of the 433 parents surveyed by researchers at the University of Virginia Commonwealth said their average child weight gained 9.6 pounds. Parents of children aged 5 to 18 were asked about their child’s weight concerns before the pandemic and again in May and September 2020. The period was concerned about that trend and sought to monitor and limit children’s eating habits in both May and September. However, in families where the child did not gain weight, parents were initially worried about their child’s food intake and were monitoring it in May, but by September they had stopped doing so. Psychosocial factors that can contribute to weight gain in children and adolescents, “said Melanie, an associate professor of pediatrics and co-director of the Healthy Lifestyle Center at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Richmond Children’s Hospital. Bean wrote in a summary. Another study presented at the weight conference looked at the effects on children when families make fun of them and make other critical comments about their weight. It was. According to a study, Tufts University researchers found that exposure to family negative comments about weight was “significantly associated with internalization of moderate to high levels of weight bias, even just three times a month. By having a prejudice against weight and internalizing it, we can predict weight gain in itself. “In general perception, a little embarrassment or prejudice causes people to lose weight. It may be motivating, but that’s not what we’ve seen in the study, “said Rebecca Puhl, Deputy Director of Rudd. The Food Policy and Obesity Center at Tufts University said in a previous interview that CNN. “In fact, when people experience weight bias, this actually contributes to unhealthy eating behavior, reduced physical activity, and weight gain,” said Puhl. “Our study. According to, parents tend to be much more effective when they put their conversations into healthy behavior. ”The focus is not on weight scale numbers, but the whole family eating fruits and vegetables and watering soda. Online grocery shopping to change and eat According to a survey conducted early in the pandemic, March and April 2020, one-third of the approximately 18,000 families surveyed online groceries. What are the main reasons for shopping at? More than 80% “to avoid public bacteria and COVID-19”, 44% “want to take advantage of convenience”, at Tufts University Chapel Hill Food prices are rising in tightly restricted areas, according to Shu Wen Ng, associate professor of nutrition. Researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science Policy at Tufts University analyzed retail. In 133 counties in the United States. We examined the prices of food and other consumer goods and compared them with the level of COVID-19 restrictions imposed by local governments. The results showed that higher levels of government restrictions during the pandemic were associated with higher food prices, but did not affect the cost of other consumer goods.

COVID-19 has influenced our lives in many ways, including how we eat and shop. Changes have not always been on the right track, according to a series of reports presented at the American Society for Nutrition’s annual meeting on Monday.

Increased intake of junk food

According to an analysis by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, some of us are consuming more unhealthy snacks and desserts such as chips, cookies and ice cream, while sweet coffee and tea, regular sodas and fruit drinks. It turns out that some people are also drinking sugary drinks., Sports drinks and energy drinks.

More than one-third (36%) of nearly 4,000 Americans surveyed in June 2020 reported eating unhealthy snacks and desserts than before the pandemic, and 22% reported sugar. I answered that I might drink a drink containing sugar.

However, 16% said they eat snacks and sweets frequently or constantly, and 10% say they eat sweet drinks as well. People who report eating the most unhealthy foods and drinks are more likely to be identified as Hispanic or black, under 65, obese, female, low-income and poorly educated.

The same survey also asked about food availability and safety. Nearly 6 out of 10 people (mainly low-income, unemployed, black or Hispanic adults) do not have access to food at nearby stores or are infected with COVID-19 from food. I answered that I was worried. Early concerns that COVID-19 could spread through food packaging Immediately discounted by scientists..

According to nutritionist Brianna Dumas, a fellow at the CDC’s research participation program, these findings “reduce fear and prevent unintended negative behavior, such as food hoarding and panic buying, in strategies and communication. It emphasizes the importance. “

In addition, public health officials need to emphasize “consumer awareness of emergency food access options, including promoting hunger safety net programs, especially among imbalance-affected groups.” Dumas said.

A drop of health food

Another study analyzed the diets of more than 2,000 Americans before and during the pandemic and found that consumption of health foods such as vegetables and whole grains has declined over the past year.

“This decline was most pronounced among female, black and Latin research participants, and those who gained at least 5 pounds or more since 2018,” said Caroline, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.・ Umm said in a statement.

Um will track study participants to understand how their diet continues to change.Other studies investigate factors such as mental health and financial stress factors, It may be involved in changes in feeding behavior.

The child got fat

Nearly 30% of the 433 parents surveyed by Virginia Commonwealth University researchers say their children gained an average of 9.6 pounds in the months from May to September 2020.

Before the pandemic and in May and September 2020, we asked parents of children aged 5 to 18 again about their weight concerns.

Family members who said their children gained weight during that period were concerned about this trend and sought to monitor and limit their children’s eating habits in both May and September. However, in families where the child did not gain weight, parents were initially worried about monitoring their child’s food intake in May, but by September they had stopped doing so.

Further research is needed to investigate and target “various behavioral, social, environmental and psychosocial factors” that may contribute to weight gain in children and adolescents, Associate Professor of Pediatrics And Melanie Bean, co-director of the Healthy Lifestyle Center, said. Summary at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Richmond Children’s Hospital.

Make fun of people about weight

Another study presented at the conference looked at the effects on children when families make fun of them and make other critical comments about their weight. According to a study, Tufts University researchers commented on family’s negative comments about weight that “only three times a month was significantly associated with the internalization of moderate to high levels of weight bias.” I found.

Previous research When children and adults experience weight prejudice and internalize it, it shows that it can itself predict weight gain.

“It’s generally accepted that a little shame or stigma may motivate you to lose weight, but research doesn’t seem to do that,” said Rebecca Pull, Deputy Director of the University of Connecticut’s Rad Food Policy and Obesity Center. Says. Told CNN in a previous interview.

In fact, when people experience weight prejudice, this actually contributes to unhealthy eating behavior, reduced physical activity, and weight gain, “says Puhl.” Parents, according to our study. Tends to be more effective when they put their conversations into sound behavior.

“The focus is not on the scales, but on the whole family eating fruits and vegetables, turning soda into water, and doing daily physical activity,” she added.

Online grocery shopping

A survey conducted early in the pandemic (March and April 2020) found that one-third of the approximately 18,000 households surveyed purchased groceries online, 60% of which. Will continue to do so after the pandemic has passed.

What’s the main reason? According to Shu Wen Ng, an associate professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, more than 80% said they wanted to avoid public bacteria and COVID-19, and 44% said they wanted to take advantage of convenience. At Chapel Hill.

Rising food prices in tightly restricted areas

Researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science Policy at Tufts University analyzed retail prices for food and other consumer goods in 133 counties in the United States and compared them to the level of COVID-19 limits imposed by local governments.

The results showed that higher levels of government restrictions during the pandemic were associated with higher food prices, but did not affect the cost of other consumer goods.

How the pandemic changed our diet

Source link How the pandemic changed our diet

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