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Her mom fought a 1918 pandemic, she fights this

She is 76 years old, but nurse practitioner Sigrid Stokes has no intention of retiring. Stokes is busy working to save lives during a deadly pandemic, as his mother did over a century ago. The late Christine Berg Mueller took care of people who were hit by the deadly flu epidemic that hit the world in 1918, but Stokes vaccinated health care workers who are fighting the coronavirus. I am. Mueller was a 14-year-old student in his native Norway at the time of the flu epidemic. In the end, an estimated 50 million people died, of which about 675,000 died, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So she and her friend offered as much help as possible at a local hospital. Mr. Stokes was recently preparing to vaccinate at the Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital near his home in Northern California. You would imagine feeding people, taking a bath, changing beds, and so on. ” Decades after the flu epidemic passed, Stokes’ mother told her that it inspired her to become a nurse. The family didn’t have the money to send her to a nursing school, but her aunt in San Francisco agreed to accept her. She emigrated to the United States in 1923 and enrolled in a US nursing program four years later. Eventually she married and moved to Los Angeles, where Stokes’ father ran a rental bookstore and his mother continued her nursing career. During her mission, she was sometimes called into a movie studio to ensure she was safe and healthy while her child actor was on the set. In many pictures of her mother, Stokes has one that makes her look proud in her uniform she’s talking to her child actor, Shirley Temple. White-haired Stokes with purplish bangs and black-framed glasses bring to his work the same sense of joy in helping people. When she administers a vaccine, she’s all in business. “I give a very good shot, I might add, a good jab,” she says with a smile. She wears a surgical mask and proves it when she skillfully thrusts a needle into the arm of an unmasked healthcare worker. It wasn’t until his late twenties that Stokes decided to take his mother to nursing. “I was volunteering in a pediatric ward, and I suddenly noticed. I really like this.” She remembered. When the coronavirus began to dominate the country early last year, Stokes was still part-time. Worked at thyme. She was too old to safely treat a COVID-19 patient, but knew she could help with vaccination. She arrives at work daily from her home in Pacific Grove. When she wore enamel earrings made from a Norwegian necklace that her mother proudly wore. The day before she died in 1995 at the age of 91. “She is with me and our family. Feels like a kind of guardian, so I wear them every time I come to work. We do that, “Stokes said. Her mother has a black cape that she has been wearing for years on a white nurse uniform. With COVID-19 killing more than 2 million people worldwide, including more than 450,000 in the United States, Stokes is not ready to stop until the virus is tamed. “We have to accomplish this,” she said. “We need to get people vaccinated so that we can move this country again.”

She is 76 years old, but nurse practitioner Sigrid Stokes has no intention of retiring.

Stokes is busy working to save lives during a deadly pandemic, as his mother did over a century ago.

The late Christine Berg Mueller took care of people who were hit by the deadly flu epidemic that hit the world in 1918, but Stokes vaccinated health care workers who are fighting the coronavirus. I am.

Mueller was a 14-year-old student in his native Norway at the time of the flu epidemic. Eventually, an estimated 50 million people died, including about 675,000 in the United States, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“So she and her friends volunteered at a local hospital and helped them in the best possible way: they could feed people, take a bath, change beds, whatever they could. I think, “Stokes said recently. She was preparing to receive the vaccine at the Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital near her home in Northern California.

Decades after the flu epidemic passed, Stokes’ mother told her that it inspired her to become a nurse.

The family didn’t have the money to send her to a nursing school, but her aunt in San Francisco agreed to accept her. She emigrated to the United States in 1923 and enrolled in a US nursing program four years later.

Eventually she married and moved to Los Angeles, where Stokes’ father ran a rental bookstore and his mother continued her nursing career.

During her mission, she was sometimes called into a movie studio to ensure she was safe and healthy while her child actor was on the set. In many pictures of her mother, Stokes has one that makes her look proud in her uniform she’s talking to her child actor, Shirley Temple.

White-haired Stokes with purplish bangs and black-framed glasses bring to his work the same sense of joy in helping people. When she administers a vaccine, she’s all in business.

“I give a very good shot, I might add, a good jab,” she says with a smile.

She wears a surgical mask and proves it when she skillfully thrusts a needle into the arm of a masked healthcare worker who does not even flinch.

It wasn’t until his late twenties that Stokes decided to pursue his mother in nursing.

“I was volunteering in a pediatric ward, but I suddenly realized that I really like this,” she recalls.

Stokes was still working part-time when the coronavirus began to dominate the country early last year. She was too old to safely treat a COVID-19 patient, but knew she could help with vaccination.

When she arrives at work every day from her home in Pacific Grove, she wears enamel earrings made from a Norwegian necklace that her mother proudly wore before she died in 1995 at the age of 91.

“She feels like a talisman with me and our family, so I wear them every time I come to work. We do that,” the mother said for years. Stokes, who still has a black cloak that he also wore, said her white nurse uniform.

With COVID-19 killing more than 2 million people worldwide, including more than 450,000 in the United States, Stokes is not ready to stop until the virus is tamed.

“We have to accomplish this,” she said. “We need to get people vaccinated so that we can move this country again.”

Her mom fought a 1918 pandemic, she fights this

Source link Her mom fought a 1918 pandemic, she fights this

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