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Conservation Heritage Museum to open in Middle Creek

The first time a visitor steps into the Conservation Heritage Museum in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​the Pennsylvania Games Commission, it will be open to the public on June 25th and will welcome some of the annoyances.

And that is the point.

“When we come in, we talk about the need for Game Rating and Administration, which focuses on wildlife exploitation in the 1800s and 1900s and the creation of a storyline for the needs of institutions like us. “We will deploy to,” said Lauren Ferreri. Middle Creek Visitor and Biology Manager at a facility near Klinefelter’s Building, Lebanon County.

The first two displays are pretty calm.

They include the passenger pigeon with the 19th century net used to capture them and the punt gun used by market hunters to thin out the flock (basically a large muzzle loader that has much in common with the small cannon). Breech shotgun) is included. Of wading birds and waterfowl.

“Passenger pigeon is a good example of why a game commission was needed,” Ferreri continued. “We had a species that was very infested with millions of birds, but by the early 1900s it had dropped to zero due to excessive persecution.”

Visitors will be guided through the chronological development of the Game Rating and Administration Committee from its establishment in 1895 to the present.

“The great thing about Game Rating and Administration is that we were the first bird and mammal wildlife agency to be established in the United States to promote this wildlife conservation,” Ferreri said.

Without the efforts of Bill Bower, a member of the thirteenth class, who graduated from the Rossrefler Conservation School in 1969, the hundreds of artifacts that tell the story of the museum and the Game Commission would not have been possible.

Bauer, 82, was assigned to western Bradford County and served for 34 years before retiring in 2002.

Bill Bower wears one of the original uniforms for the Pennsylvania Games Commission’s guardian, with a life-sized cardboard notch, June 25 at the Conservation History Museum at the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Visitor Center. We are exhibiting the grand opening of the day. Area of ​​Klinefelter’s Building, Lebanon County. (BILL UHRICH — Reading Eagle)

“Avid collector Bill donated most of the artifacts found in the museum as another way to share its history with others,” said the Game Rating and Administration Committee as the first female guardian. Cheryl Trewella, who paved the way for herself, said. “It’s no exaggeration to say that Bill saved everything from his time at PGC when it comes to how Bill collects artifacts.”

According to Trewella, many of his colleagues knew they were interested in collecting material for game commissions and were sending things their own way. He actively searched for items related to the history of PGCs.

The example on display is part of a quilt made from an old shelter sign originally printed on cloth.

“The wife of one of the early shelter caretakers used the quilt-lined sign she made,” Trewella said. “Bill tried to buy the entire quilt, but it was overpriced. The guy broke it up and sold the signs individually, and Bill bought some of them.”

The sign was once printed on cloth. This artifact was once part of the quilt and is on display at the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Klinefelter's Building, Lebanon County. 25th. (BILL UHRICH ??
The sign was once printed on cloth, but the artifact is part of the quilt and is on display at the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Kleinfeldersville, Lebanon County. .. (BILL UHRICH — READING EAGLE)

As visitors pass through the museum, they are covered in many themes such as training and specialization of committee officers, the use of various techniques in game management, and advances in habitat management.

The uniform display and the life of the cadets of the Game Commission will be part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Kleinfeldersville, Lebanon County, and will open its grand opening on June 25. .. (BILL UHRICH ??
The imaginative artwork that seeks to educate the general public about birds of prey is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area. (BILL UHRICH — Reading Eagle)

All in all, visitors find that education is one of the most important aspects of the Game Rating’s efforts. The development of Pennsylvania Game News is one such educational endeavor, along with many imaginative signs that emphasize the safety of hunters and the protection of non-gaming species.

The imaginative artwork that seeks to educate the general public about birds of prey is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Kleinfeltersville, Lebanon County, which will open on June 25. .. (BILL UHRICH ??
The imaginative artwork that seeks to educate the general public about birds of prey is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Kleinfeldersville, Lebanon County. (BILL UHRICH — Reading Eagle)

The Games Commission has hired many wildlife artists throughout its history, including Burke’s County artist and avian scholars Nedsmith and Earlpool, who painted several scenes for the cover of Pennsylvania Game News in the 1950s. It is commendable for what you have done.

The museum also emphasizes the Game Rating and Administration Committee’s success story.

“One of the biggest things we all know is the resurrection of the bald eagle, so we really dive into it,” Ferreri said. “In the late 1980s, there were three nests and now more than 300, so this reintroduction effort after the DDT ban was a huge success. This is the most obvious story. And the general public knows it well. “

The exhibition of the successful bald eagle reintroduction program is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Kleinfelters Building, Lebanon County, and will open its grand opening on June 25th. (BILL UHRICH ??
The exhibition of the successful bald eagle reintroduction program is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Klinefelter’s Building, Lebanon County. (BILL UHRICH — Reading Eagle)

The museum is also not afraid to tackle what went wrong.

“We also learned that bounties aren’t working,” Ferreri said. “People have very negative implications for predators, especially for hawks and owls in the early 20th century. Many of our pamphlets mention the blessings of goshawks, but recently in the state. Listed as an endangered species. It’s interesting to see how things have changed so much from the early 1900s to the present. Predating what you thought was negative during the 100 years. As a result, it is now protected to the extent that it is listed as an endangered species in the state. “

The museum concludes with exhibits of state wildlife conservation heroes such as Gifford Pinchot, Roger Latham, Rachel Carson, Nedsmith, Gary Alto, Rosalie Edge and Ross Leffler.

The Pennsylvania Conservation Hero Exhibit is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Klinefelter's Building, Lebanon County, and will open its grand opening on June 25th. (BILL UHRICH ??
The Pennsylvania Conservation Hero Exhibit is part of the Conservation History Museum at the Visitor Center in the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area of ​​Klinefelter’s Building, Lebanon County. (BILL UHRICH — Reading Eagle)

“All these old stories of the way we used to do things are like waiting for us, why did we do that?” Ferreri asked. “It’s easy to say now, but it seemed right at the time. 100 years later, people would definitely ask why they did this.

“That’s the biggest lesson here. All of this is constantly changing, and without these protection heroes, many of these positive things wouldn’t have happened at all. So it’s protection and the wild. It is very important to remember that it is a continuous process of fighting for the creatures. “

Conservation Heritage Museum to open in Middle Creek

Source link Conservation Heritage Museum to open in Middle Creek

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