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Book Review: “Living in the Moment” Proves That Dementia Does Not Mean End | Lifestyle

Dad was proud of the convenience. He could make anything, imagine anything, and fix anything. He was convenient from tools to toys, from the kitchen to children. But last week, Dad got lost on his way home from the grocery store. He scared both you and you on a weekly trip for 30 years. You might imagine what’s coming. Find and prepare for “Living in the Moment” by Elizabeth Landsberg, Maryland and Heather Miller. So you noticed some memory or cognitive problems, and Dad isn’t himself lately. How do you know if this new behavior is eccentric or early dementia? Is this a normal sign of aging or is it abnormal? What dementia can he suffer and how much can he suffer? You will want to get an official diagnosis, so you know what to do in the future and why. The first thing you need to know what your dad is experiencing is that dementia doesn’t mean “it’s all over”. Perhaps for years to come, there is still a lot of life for both you and you. Second, remember that your loved one is not “getting hard”. Their violent and unusual behavior is unavoidable, and the illness is “very uncertain and very uneven.” There may be possible ways to deal with oblivion, frustration, anger, behavior, and there are things to avoid. Landsverk says the solution is sometimes fun, and even fun. Alzheimer’s disease and dementia cannot be cured, so plan for the care of your loved ones. However, please review it frequently. Things change as time and illness progress, so please be happy to see the “big picture.” This includes thinking about end-of-life issues, adult guardianship, and long-term legal and financial protection. Beware of scams. Too many people prey on our vulnerable seniors. Encourage physical activity, good diet, and as much autonomy as possible today. Learn how to create workarounds for problems that are easy to deal with. Also, keep in mind that “you need a village to care for the elderly with dementia” and “you are not alone”. Sand is not your friend. When a loved one shows signs of dementia, it’s certainly not where you want to stab your head. Because that life is not the beach. No, it’s easy to manage and “Living in the Moment” is useful. It may not be as thorough or comprehensive as you would like later, but in her introduction, author Landsverk (with author Millar) wants to make this book easier to use. She succeeded in getting a basic overview, what she needs to know now, what works and what doesn’t, problems to watch out for, and what to prepare for the future. The case studies in this book are powerful and scary enough to spur swift action, and they are balanced with a quiet paragraph of comfort. This book is great for caregivers, but it’s also a must-read book for anyone who is somehow involved with people with dementia. Find “Living in the Moment” and keep it handy.

Dad was proud of the convenience.

He could make anything, imagine anything, and fix anything. He was convenient from tools to toys, from the kitchen to children. But last week, Dad got lost on his way home from the grocery store. He scared both you and you on a weekly trip for 30 years. You might imagine what’s coming. Find and prepare for “Living in the Moment” by Elizabeth Landsberg, Maryland and Heather Miller.

So you noticed some memory or cognitive problems, and Dad isn’t himself lately. How do you know if this new behavior is eccentric or early dementia? Is this a normal sign of aging or is it abnormal? What dementia can he suffer and how much can he suffer? You will want to get an official diagnosis, so you know what to do in the future and why.

The first thing you need to know what your dad is experiencing is that dementia doesn’t mean “it’s all over”. Perhaps for years to come, there is still a lot of life for both you and you.

Second, remember that your loved one is not “getting hard”. Their violent and unusual behavior is unavoidable, and the illness is “very uncertain and very uneven.” There may be possible ways to deal with oblivion, frustration, anger, behavior, and there are things to avoid. Landsverk says the solution is sometimes fun, and even fun.

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia cannot be cured, so plan for the care of your loved ones. However, please review it frequently. Things change as time and illness progress, so please be happy to see the “big picture.” This includes thinking about end-of-life issues, adult guardianship, and long-term legal and financial protection.

Beware of scams. Too many people prey on our vulnerable seniors. Encourage physical activity, good diet, and as much autonomy as possible today. Learn how to create workarounds for problems that are easy to deal with. Also, keep in mind that “you need a village to care for the elderly with dementia” and “you are not alone”.

Sand is not your friend.

When a loved one shows signs of dementia, it’s certainly not where you want to stab your head. Because that life is not the beach. No, it’s easy to manage and “Living in the Moment” is useful.

It may not be as thorough or comprehensive as you would like later, but in her introduction, author Landsverk (with author Millar) wants to make this book easier to use. She succeeded in getting a basic overview, what she needs to know now, what works and what doesn’t, problems to watch out for, and what to prepare for the future. The case studies in this book are powerful and scary enough to spur swift action, and they are balanced with a quiet paragraph of comfort.

This book is great for caregivers, but it’s also a must-read book for anyone who is somehow involved with people with dementia. Find “Living in the Moment” and keep it handy.

Elizabeth Landsberg, Maryland, Heather Miller, 2022, Citadel, p. 288, $ 16.95, “Living in the Moment: Overcoming Challenges and Discovering Moments of Joy in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia.”

Elizabeth Landsberg, Maryland, Heather Miller, 2022, Citadel, p. 288, $ 16.95, “Living in the Moment: Overcoming Challenges and Discovering Moments of Joy in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia.”

Book Review: “Living in the Moment” Proves That Dementia Does Not Mean End | Lifestyle

Source link Book Review: “Living in the Moment” Proves That Dementia Does Not Mean End | Lifestyle

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