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Ask the Master Gardener for a fall webworm moth

Pennsylvania State University, Berks County Master Gardener, features questions and answers to questions received through the Garden Hotline.

Question: What is a shrub with white flowers along the roadside? Can I grow it in the garden?

Answer: These plants are Japanese knotweed. They are very invasive and any part of the plant roots very easily in moist soil. Persicaria serrata have poor erosion control and can deteriorate aquatic habitat and water quality. In addition, native plants flock. This is not a vegetable garden plant. Details: https: //extension.psu.edu/japanese-knotweed

Question: What is the web found on the edge of a tree branch? Are they harmful? How do you handle them?

Answer: You are looking at the fall webworm. Do not confuse with tent larvae that nest in the crotch of trees in the spring. The fall webworm is a moth larval stage that skeletonizes and consumes leaves within the protective web.

The web expands as caterpillars grow and need additional food. This activity occurs near the end of the growing season and does not require chemical treatment. If you can reach the spider web, you can pierce the spider web and the birds will be able to eat the insects. Details: https: //extension.psu.edu/fall-webworm

The Master Gardener at Penn State University has advanced diagnostic training staff on the hotline for lawn care, landscaping plants, houseplants, fruits, vegetables, herbs, insect and disease problems, and identification of unknown plants and insects. I will answer the question. The advice is based on an integrated pest management strategy and an environmentally friendly approach. For more information on these and other gardening-related topics, email the Garden Hotline (berksmg@psu.edu), call 610-378-1327 and talk to the Master Gardener, or 1238 County. Make a reservation for Wednesday Zoom to stop by the office. Welfare Road, Leesport, Pa.19533. The building needs a mask.

Ask the Master Gardener for a fall webworm moth

Source link Ask the Master Gardener for a fall webworm moth

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