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A daily dress-up game teaches a 5-year-old child about the history of blacks

A Michigan mother uses a daily dress-up game to teach her daughter about the most influential black people. For the third year in a row, Taylor Trotter has dressed his daughter Paisley as the most influential black pioneer. Every day she takes pictures of Paisley dressed as another historical figure, posts them side-by-side on Facebook, and adds captions to explain each person’s contribution to American history. February is Black History Month. Five-year-old Paisley disguised himself as a key figure such as Serena Williams, Kamala Harris, Jackie Robinson, and Mae C. Jemison. Trotter came up with an idea while taking a child psychology class at school, where he learned about the hardships of children. Interracial background. Mr. Trotter said the class helped children with multicultural backgrounds identify groups and understand that it can be difficult to learn who they are. “History”. “And I hope this helps her feel confident in loving who she is.” At the end of each year, Trotter collects photos and captions to make a book. She and Paisley see it all year round, giving them the opportunity to continuously learn and pay homage to these historical figures. “This teaches her that just because people are different doesn’t mean they’re worthless.” In an annual project, Trotter was lost to police atrocities this year in Black America. He said he wanted to emphasize people’s lives. She gathered 10 people to pay homage to. One of them dates back to the 1970s. “It’s a systematic problem, and we’re trying to make people aware that they’re passing on this hatred from generation to generation. Trotter tells CNN about the systematic problems that America faces. He said he believes it is important to be honest with his daughter. “Racism has no age, so children are too young to learn about it,” Trotter said. Said. “I don’t want to blindly send her to the world because of the fact that people might treat her differently just because of her appearance.” Trotter recognizes the differences and similarities between her and her daughter. doing. She says having an interracial daughter broadened her horizons. “These aren’t necessarily things I had to think about before,” Trotter said. “It helped me as a mom. I feel like I’m playing my part in educating my daughter and making a difference.” Daily Black History Month posts can be found on their Facebook page. can do.

A Michigan mother uses a daily dress-up game to teach her daughter about the most influential black people.

For the third year in a row, Taylor Trotter has dressed his daughter Paisley as one of the most influential black pioneers. Every day she takes pictures of Paisley dressed as different historical figures, posts them side-by-side on Facebook, and adds captions to explain each person’s contribution to American history.

February is Black History Month. Five-year-old Paisley is dressed as Serena Williams, Kamala Harris, Jackie Robinson, Mae C. Jemison, and other important figures.

Trotter came up with an idea while taking a child psychology class at school. There she learned about the struggle of children from an interracial background. According to Trotter, this class helped children with multicultural backgrounds identify with groups and understand that it can be difficult to learn who they are.

“I knew I had to make a sincere effort to teach her about her black side and black history,” Trotter said. “And I hope this helps her become confident in loving who she is.”

At the end of each year, Trotter collects photos and captions to make a book. She and Paisley see it all year round, giving them the opportunity to continuously learn and pay homage to these historical figures.

“This teaches her that just because people are different doesn’t mean they’re worthless.”

While the pair was preparing for their annual project, Trotter said this year he wanted to highlight the lives of black Americans lost in police atrocities. She gathered 10 people she wanted to pay homage to. One of them dates back to the 1970s.

“I’m just trying to make people realize that this is a systematic issue and that people are passing on this hatred from generation to generation in their hearts,” Trotter said.

Trotter told CNN that it was important to be honest with her daughter about the systematic problems facing the United States.

“Racism has no age, so children are never too young to learn about it,” Trotter said. “I don’t want to blindly send her to the world because of the fact that people may treat her differently just because of her appearance.”

Trotter recognizes the differences and similarities between her and her daughter. She says having an interracial daughter broadened her horizons.

“These aren’t necessarily the ones I had to think about before,” Trotter said. “It helped me as a mom. I feel like I’m playing my part in educating my daughter and making a difference.”

You can find posts for Daily Black History Month On their Facebook page.

A daily dress-up game teaches a 5-year-old child about the history of blacks

Source link A daily dress-up game teaches a 5-year-old child about the history of blacks

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